Peter Benedict | St. Andrews | Training Playlist

 

 

Peter Benedict St Andrews: My Training Playlist

Sports trainer Peter Benedict, a St Andrews kinesiology graduate, has worked with professional athletes from the major sports leagues in North America. As a sports trainer, he has acted as a consultant for professional teams that are looking to improve their stamina, flexibility, and core strength. Peter Benedict of St Andrews is an advocate of traditional workouts that involve slow and high-intensity intervals, roadwork, warmups, and cooldowns. When he’s not working out with some of the top athletes in the world, he would like to share his expertise with a wider audience through his blog.

Believe it or not, professional athletes do not wear their game faces all the time. In fact, when I worked with a pro football team last summer, we were laughing and placing bets on whoever could deadlift the heaviest weights. Because they are actually getting paid to do what they love, one could see their passion for the sport. And to further motivate themselves during training sessions, they were fond of playing their own playlists over the gym’s PA system.

One of my mantras for working out is “Play whatever motivates you.” If you’re OK with total silence during your workout routine, that’s fine. But if you need music to set a rhythm, pump yourself up, or simply to distract yourself from the fact that you’re already lifting 250 pounds, that’s fine too. I myself have a workout playlist that I use whenever I’m at the gym, and I’d like to share three tracks with you.

1. Survivor, Eye of the Tiger. This track brings up images of Rocky Balboa jogging through Philadelphia, running up the steps of the Museum of Art, and beating James “Clubber” Lang into submission. As the main theme of the film Rocky III, it has firmly cemented its place in film and sports history – and in workout playlists throughout the world. If you are planning to start a workout playlist of your own, this should be the first song in it.

2. The White Stripes, Seven Nation Army. Multi-instrumentalist Jack White sings about a seven nation army not being able to hold him back, and that’s the kind of attitude I like to bring to the gym – planned, deliberate, and forceful. The introduction alone, which has been played and chanted at events such as the FIFA World Cup and college bowl games, should pump you up too.

3. Outkast, Hey Ya! I go to the gym out of a sense of duty – to myself and to those who depend on my health. More often than not, though, I find myself in a state of joy because of the endorphins released during the training routine. And while the lyrics to Andre 3000’s hip-hop/folk classic might seem darker upon closer reading, the tune itself is catchy, infectious, and downright happy. I always catch myself singing along to the chorus. And if that doesn’t make me a happy man in the gym, I don’t know what will.

Health and fitness are the advocacies of Peter Benedict, a St Andrews alumnus who also writes about diet and nutrition. Keep following his blog for more sports training tips.

 

Peter Benedict, St. Andrew’s College Grad On Snack Choices

Peter Benedict from St. Andrew’s College On Healthy Snacking

Peter Benedict, a St. Andrew’s College graduate, grew up loving sports and being mindful about his physical fitness. This is why he decided to pursue a career as a sports trainer when he moved to Washington. Read his blog below about his go-to snack choices:

Needing a nibble? Whether you want to lose weight or build muscles, there are a number of benefits to eating healthy snacks throughout the day. Among them are curbing cravings and sustaining energy levels so you can get through whatever activity you have lined up for the day. As long as your snack choices are healthy, you can expect to stay on track with your goals for weight control as well. Here are my top food choices for snacking:

Nuts – Known as the super snack, nuts are high in healthy fat and low in calories. They contain as much as 6g of protein per ounce of serving (one serving of nuts usually consists around 20 pieces). Just make sure you snack on unsalted nuts such as almonds, pistachios, and pecans. If you want to get additional nutrients, go for almonds as they contain calcium and Vitamin E as well.

Cottage cheese – One of the most versatile ingredients, cottage cheese can practically be eaten with anything, from fruit and crackers to salads and shakes. Low in calories, cottage cheese may also be eaten on its own. For every 100g of cottage cheese, you get 28g of protein and other nutrients like phosphorus and B vitamins.

Carrots – If you have to pick one vegetable to snack on, choose carrots. Rich in beta-carotene, fiber, vitamin K, potassium, and antioxidants, carrots are delicious, widely available, and inexpensive. As one of the world’s healthiest foods, carrots can be prepared and eaten in a variety of ways. Dipping carrots in cottage cheese, however, hits two birds with one stone.

Boiled egg – When you have to be strict about your caloric intake, snack on a boiled egg. One large egg has about 58 calories and can sufficiently satiate you. High in protein, vitamins, and minerals, eggs are also one of the few foods that contain Vitamin D.

Fruit with peanut butter – Generally, fruit like apples and bananas are great to snack on. When you get tired of eating them day after day, you can change it up by eating them with peanut butter and chia seeds. Peanut butter contains Vitamin E and potassium while chia seeds contain essential Omega-3 fatty acids for heart health. Frozen fruit are also delicious; think frozen grapes and blueberries. Just put them in ice trays for DIY fruit ice cubes and pop them in the freezer.

Whenever you feel hungry in between meals, you may also drink a glass of water instead. This is because dehydration may be mistaken for hunger or cravings so make sure you drink seven to eight glasses of water every day.

How about you? What are your go-to snacks? Feel free to share them with me here; I’d love to swap recipes for trail mixes and energy bars!

Stay tuned to read more from Peter Benedict from St. Andrew’s College.

 

Peter Benedict | St. Andrews | 3 Tips to Mental Preparation

 

Peter Benedict, St. Andrews Graduate Shares His Tips for Achieving Mental Preparedness in Sport

For Peter Benedict, a St. Andrews College graduate and sports trainer, being mentally prepared before a big game is winning half the battle. And in sports training, mental preparedness helps the athlete perform their routines well, and done regularly, achieve their desired results. In this post, Peter shares his tips for achieving mental preparedness which will serve the athletes well before, during and after training and games.

In my previous post, I talked about the importance of being mentally prepared not only in the athlete’s actual sport but also in his or her physical training sessions. I’ve mentioned it numerous times to my clients; they need to be mentally prepared so they can perform their fitness routines exceptionally well—sometimes even to the point of surpassing their previous ‘record’. And mental preparation is a daily habit; something you do consciously until the habit becomes so ingrained in you that you do it automatically before a training session or a big game. Here are three key components to mental preparation that I’ve talked about with my clients, and which I hope, will help you as well.

1. Set a goal. There’s nothing like getting in the zone than keeping your eye on your goal. For this step, I usually help my clients out by discussing with them what they wish to achieve with every training session and after we’ve completed a specific training program. First, there is the physical, body goal: toned abs and pectorals, and a slimmer, trimmer physique. Then there is the physical performance goal: enhanced strength and agility. By keeping your eye on the prize, so to speak, you feel an increasing determination to persevere until your goal is achieved.

2. Have the desire to succeed. Now that you have set your goals, what are you going to do to achieve them? Do you wish and hope that you can achieve them someday, or do you desire to achieve them come what may? You see, there is a huge difference between hope and desire. When you hope, you act to achieve your goal but you are usually dependent on external factors, waiting for things to fall into place just for you. But when you desire to achieve them, you don’t wait for things to happen or for circumstances to be favorable; you take action in the here and now regardless of what is going on in your life.

3. Motivate yourself everyday. There will be days (and plenty of them) when you won’t feel like getting up early in the morning to meet with your trainer and work out for the day. Find motivation—something to inspire you to get up from bed and train. Your goals are, of course, your ultimate motivation and inspiration, but sometimes, even these aren’t enough to compel you to train. You need to find something to motivate you every single day. And sometimes, simple things like telling yourself that “today is a great day to train” or “today brings me closer to my goals” are enough to get you started.

Stay tuned to this page to read more from Peter Benedict of St. Andrews College.

 

Peter Benedict | St. Andrews | Mental Preparedness in Sports

Peter Benedict | St. Andrews | Mental Preparedness in Sports

Peter Benedict, St. Andrews Graduate and Sports Trainer Asks: Is Your Head in the Zone?

Peter Benedict, a St. Andrews College graduate who now works as a professional sports trainer, has been working with professional athletes for years. In his line of work, he knows that much of what happens during training depends on the athlete too, not just on the trainer. Whether the day’s workout will be successful (‘successful’ is quite an ambiguous term in sports training) or not will largely depend on two things: the dynamics between the trainer and athlete, and the athlete’s mental focus. With that said, Peter would like to share his thoughts on mental preparedness in sports and sports training.

Sports commentators have uttered it in disbelief so many times; “What’s going on with so and so? His head is just not in the game.” Whatever the sport, whoever the opponent is, and no matter how physically fit the athlete is, when his or her head is just not in the zone, commentators and fans speculating about losing the game to the opposing team is quite an accurate prediction. You see, nothing is more paralyzing and debilitating than losing focus and mental clarity in the middle of an intense, career-defining game. We’ve seen it numerous times before, an athlete choking at the last minute, missing what could have been a winning shot or move and subsequently giving the game to their opponent; which brings me to my point: in sports, mental training is just as important as physical training.

Before I start each session with my clients, the first thing I would ask them is if they’re ready for the day’s workout. And by ‘ready’, they know that I was referring to their mental focus and determination to complete the day’s workout routines as best they could. If you feel too lazy to move, or you’re a little sluggish during early morning workouts, that’s perfectly fine. After a few warm-up stretches, they would already feel a little energized, and by the end of the first routine, they’re pumped-up and ready for more.

But when, after the stretches and first routine, I see that they’re still not performing up to par (by then I would already know their capacity and their usual output), I stop the training and ask them what’s going on inside their head. I know something is up when they look distracted or seem to ‘fade’ in the middle of a routine, or if they hardly ever pay attention to what I’m saying. They have zoned out and gone to a different mental plane, is what I like to say. And no amount of physical exertion can get them back in the zone, so to speak. I sit them down and ask what is bothering them. Those who know me will not find this unusual. I’ve always had the inclination to help others which is why I got into sports training in the first place.

If, after the talk, the athlete still seems distracted or unable to focus, I call it a day. I see no point in pushing the athlete to the point of physical exertion when their heart and mind isn’t in it. Yes, I am a strict trainer but I am compassionate too. The overall wellbeing of my clients is topmost in my list of priorities, and this covers mental wellbeing too.

In my next post, I will be talking about steps that you can do to mentally prepare for training and sports so please watch out for that.

Stay tuned to this page to read more from Peter Benedict of St. Andrews College.

Peter Benedict, a St. Andrew’s College Grad, Talks About Healthy Diets

Peter Benedict (St. Andrews): The No. 1 Thing You Should Remember About Healthy Diets

Peter Benedict, St. Andrew’s College graduate, hopes to provide readers with information about sports training, athletics, and everything in-between. Read his blog below on what makes up a healthy diet:

The road to fitness is often long and trying, but that’s only in the beginning, before people find their stride. There is this misconception that fitness is a race, or a sprint, where the first person to the finish line wins the prize. The truth is, as with many things in life, fitness isn’t a race; it’s a marathon where the journey is the destination as well.

Unfortunately, many people approach fitness without respect or patience for the process. Among everything—whether bulking, exercising, or recovering—eating healthy is still viewed with less importance. Ever wonder why there continues to be crazy fad diets and trends year after year, despite warnings from experts? Or why there seems to be new slimming pills, teas, and other products in the market, claiming yet again a new—and often unverified—way to lose weight? This only shows how desperate and gullible people are to get fit in an instant, but there are no shortcuts to this journey, including healthy eating. In a nutshell, what you consume or put inside your body is what you’ll get. No more, no less.

No more, no less—this should give one a good idea just how strict calorie counting is in the fitness community. Why? What’s the deal with calorie counting, you ask? Many people may be surprised to know that the type of food they eat may matter less than calories. In other words, if your goal is to have a healthy diet, then by all means you shouldn’t deprive yourself that juicy burger or slice of cheese pizza as long as you’re keeping track of your caloric intake. This runs against what is commonly read in the media that one should shun unhealthy, “junk” foods no matter what, but healthy eating isn’t all that black and white.

In one research published at the Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, Bray GA et al. found that the body’s metabolic responses were no different whether one had fast food (burger, French fries, the works), an organic beef meal, or a turkey meal with granola and organic orange juice. The only difference that was of statistical importance was the decrease in LDL cholesterol for the organic beef meal. Based on the findings of this study, one may come to the conclusion that calories and macros should matter more than fretting about organic, whole, and other green-marketing adjectives.

Of course, this finding alone doesn’t sanitize the awful reputation of fast food, but as part of the adage goes, “Too much of anything is bad” and in the case of eating healthy foods, the only bad thing it seems to be going on here is that you’ll miss the “unhealthy goodness” of burgers, fries, donuts, soda, and everything else branded as junk.

In the end, go ahead and treat yourself once in awhile. Cheat days wouldn’t be cheat days as long as you’re religiously keeping count of those calories and macros.

To read more from Peter Benedict St. Andrew’s College, stay tuned to this blog.

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Peter Benedict, St. Andrew’s College Grad On Exercise Motivation and Discipline

Peter Benedict, St. Andrew’s College Grad: Top 5 Ways to Get Disciplined About Your Fitness Goals

Peter Benedict St. Andrew’s College graduate, believes that no one is a hopeless case. Having worked with numerous professional athletes who failed to meet standards, he has seen firsthand how sheer determination can begin the process of transformation. Read his tips below for getting disciplined about exercise:

As they say, showing up at the gym is half the battle. So how do you trick yourself into moving and to start working out when that bag of crispy potato chips wants to keep you company on the couch? There’s no one single approach to becoming more disciplined about exercising, but here are some of the best hacks you can try:

1. Create a calendar – What’s so special about marking dates on your planner? For one, you can have enough time to mentally, physically, and emotionally prepare yourself to get moving. There’s also something to be said about seeing an entire calendar with large X marks on it to remind you of how far you’ve already come—indeed, why stop now and snap that streak? Before you know it, the best reminder of your discipline and persistence is seeing the actual results on the weighing scale, for example.

2. Find an accountability partner – Sometimes, we just need a good nudge to spring onto action, and what better way to be prodded than to have an accountability partner who can also double as your own coach and personal cheerleader? However, one caveat to having an accountability partner is that you must find someone whom you respect and will hate to disappointed if you don’t walk your talk. Ideally, they may also be into fitness and exercising as well, so they’ll be equally serious in holding you accountable.

3. Set up a reward system – Think exercise is a chore? A reward system might help. Rewards and incentives are one of the oldest tricks in the book for building up a habit, but be sure not to choose a reward that will offset your gains. For instance, don’t be fooled into thinking that you can eat whatever you please just because you spent half an hour on the treadmill. If you’re going to have such a system, the rewards should also be proportionate to the effort you expend at the gym.

4. Find an activity you actually enjoy – Have you thought of getting into other forms of physical activity besides hitting the gym? As a professional trainer, I’ve met many people in my career who have thrived doing something that they actually enjoyed, whether it’s swimming, Capoeria, or MMA. By doing an activity you actually enjoy, you would have found yourself doing it for the sake of it, even inviting others to join you, instead of being dragged.

5. Make exercise unavoidable – Experts recommend getting half an hour to an hour’s exercise everyday but for busy people who seem to be always on the go, this is already a tall order. One way these people can have more time for exercise is to make it unavoidable. For instance, walking to work, or taking a longer route than usual will help.

To read more from Peter Benedict, St. Andrew’s College Grad, stay tuned to this blog.

 

Peter Benedict | St. Andrews | Mental Preparedness in Sports

Peter Benedict, St. Andrews Graduate and Sports Trainer Asks: Is Your Head in the Zone?

Peter Benedict, St. Andrews College graduate who now works as a professional sports trainer, has been working with professional athletes for years. In his line of work, he knows that much of what happens during training depends on the athlete too, not just on the trainer. Whether the day’s workout will be successful (‘successful’ is quite an ambiguous term in sports training) or not will largely depend on two things: the dynamics between the trainer and athlete, and the athlete’s mental focus. With that said, Peter would like to share his thoughts on mental preparedness in sports and sports training.

Sports commentators have uttered it in disbelief so many times; “What’s going on with so and so? His head is just not in the game.” Whatever the sport, whoever the opponent is, and no matter how physically fit the athlete is, when his or her head is just not in the zone, commentators and fans speculating about losing the game to the opposing team is quite an accurate prediction. You see, nothing is more paralyzing and debilitating than losing focus and mental clarity in the middle of an intense, career-defining game. We’ve seen it numerous times before, an athlete choking at the last minute, missing what could have been a winning shot or move and subsequently giving the game to their opponent; which brings me to my point: in sports, mental training is just as important as physical training.

Before I start each session with my clients, the first thing I would ask them is if they’re ready for the day’s workout. And by ‘ready’, they know that I was referring to their mental focus and determination to complete the day’s workout routines as best they could. If you feel too lazy to move, or you’re a little sluggish during early morning workouts, that’s perfectly fine. After a few warm-up stretches, they would already feel a little energized, and by the end of the first routine, they’re pumped-up and ready for more.

But when, after the stretches and first routine, I see that they’re still not performing up to par (by then I would already know their capacity and their usual output), I stop the training and ask them what’s going on inside their head. I know something is up when they look distracted or seem to ‘fade’ in the middle of a routine, or if they hardly ever pay attention to what I’m saying. They have zoned out and gone to a different mental plane, is what I like to say. And no amount of physical exertion can get them back in the zone, so to speak. I sit them down and ask what is bothering them. Those who know me will not find this unusual. I’ve always had the inclination to help others which is why I got into sports training in the first place.

If, after the talk, the athlete still seems distracted or unable to focus, I call it a day. I see no point in pushing the athlete to the point of physical exertion when their heart and mind isn’t in it. Yes, I am a strict trainer but I am compassionate too. The overall wellbeing of my clients is topmost in my list of priorities, and this covers mental wellbeing too.

In my next post, I will be talking about steps that you can do to mentally prepare for training and sports so please watch out for that. Please visit my Crunchbase at Peter Benedict St Andrews.

Stay tuned to this page to read more from Peter Benedict St. Andrews College Graduate. 

 

Peter Benedict, St. Andrew’s College Grad On The Psychological Benefits of Exercise

Peter Benedict, St. Andrew’s College Grad: Is Exercise Good for Depression?

Peter Benedict, St. Andrew’s College graduate, is a professional sports trainer for athletes whose passion has always been to help people. Read his thought piece below about exercising to combat depression.

According to the World Health Organization, there are an estimated 300 million people from different age groups who are suffering from depression. While depression has been found to be common, the stigma of mental disorders has prohibited the public discourse in general from becoming more supportive and compassionate towards those who suffer from it. This is where exercise may provide the biggest benefit to those who are depressed—by providing them with a way to cope with and ward off the feelings of depression.

Many people swear by the beneficial effects of exercising in terms of helping with depression and fortunately, there is no shortage of studies and research that delve deeper into this subject. In one study published at Cochrane Library, researchers Cooney, Dwan, Greig et al. found that exercising to combat depression is more effective for patients compared to receiving no therapy at all; notably, with reducing symptoms. Even though the researchers’ work noted that exercise was no more effective than other psychological therapies, their findings nonetheless point in the right direction—confirming anecdotal evidence and what people have long experienced firsthand, that exercise for depression works.

Understanding the psychological benefits of exercise doesn’t require a degree in rocket science. In a nutshell, whenever you exercise, your body releases chemicals that can ultimately affect your mood. You may be familiar with endorphins—it’s that euphoric high you get after running a 5K, for instance. It’s interesting to note that the release of endorphins in the body feels similar to that of getting a shot of morphine, which may partly explain why people look forward to “feeling good” after a workout. However, the two chemicals have different long-term effects. Endorphins won’t lead you down a path towards a debilitating addiction.

Aside from releasing endorphins, exercising can also lower blood pressure and protect against heart disease and cancer. This is based on a special health report done by the Harvard Medical School Health Publications. According to the study, a half-an-hour to an hour’s exercise on most, if not all, days of the week should be helpful for sufferers. To us trainers, squeezing some time for exercise is always a good idea, but at the same time, we haven’t forgotten that a good majority of people who wish to have a healthy active lifestyle struggle to make good on this promise on a daily basis. This is why, both as a trainer and someone who advocates a healthy lifestyle, I hope my blog can inspire others to get up from the couch and start moving, pronto. For those who are depressed, know that showing up is half the battle. Every day you go for a brisk walk or a short jog is a day you beat depression and win.

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